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Carpe Diem weekend-meditation #6: Nodding Sunflowers

Carpe Diem weekend-meditation #6 Kamishibai challenge:

sunflower-02_7_13

 

Today’s challenge was to write a Haibun in which we had to use the Haiku provided by Chèvrefeuille. A Haibun involves writing a haiku and prose. 

Kamishibai (紙芝居), literally “paper drama”, is a form of storytelling that originated in Japanese Buddhist temples in the 12th century, where monks used emakimono (picture scrolls) to convey stories with moral lessons to a mostly illiterate audience.
Kamishibai endured as a storytelling method for centuries, but is perhaps best known for its revival in the 1920s through the 1950s. The gaito kamishibaiya, or kamishibai storyteller, rode from village to village on a bicycle equipped with a small stage. On arrival, the storyteller used two wooden clappers, called hyoshigi, to announce his arrival. Children who bought candy from the storyteller got the best seats in front of the stage. Once an audience assembled, the storyteller told several stories using a set of illustrated boards, inserted into the stage and withdrawn one by one as the story was told. The stories were often serials and new episodes were told on each visit to the village.

sunflowers
My earliest memory of the cheery flowers, were the fields I saw on the ride from boarding school to the airport.The haiku provided perfectly fit how I felt on that ride back home.
blooming sunflowers
reaching for the early light of the sun –
birds praise their Creator
© Chèvrefeuille
The windows turned down, I’d watch out for the fields of yellow and they never let me down. The pretty flowers  smiled back at me sharing my joy of returning home for the summer holidays. Never ending yellows traveled, by my side, and dropped me off.
Nodding their heads; Smile,
Bright yellow, watch me pass by,
I bid thee farewell.
I’d look for them on my return, waiting to catch a glimpse of the bright, beautiful sunflowers to lift my low, home-sick spirits  but I never managed to see them. I learnt later that the return road was different from the one that would take me away from school.
Search in vain, a glimpse
Those bobbing faces, left behind,
I see them no more.
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